Joupii (1970) by Partick Rylands
Joupii (1970) by Partick Rylands

Designed by acclaimed British toy designer Patrick Reynolds, the construction of this classic, open-ended toy is as straight forward as it gets: six pieces of wood held together by an elastic cord. This design was awarded the Duke of Edinburgh’s Prize for Elegant Design.

Bath Duck (1993) by Patrick Rylands
Bath Duck (1993) by Patrick Rylands

Recently released by Galt Toys, the Bath Duck is an iconic toy conceived by pioneering, British designer Patrick Rylands, whode attendtion to detail is outsanding: the slightest movement of the water does not only set the moving beak into motion, but it also acts as an escape route for any water entering the toy.

Mix and Match Animals (2015) by Lisa Mahar
Mix and Match Animals (2015) by Lisa Mahar

This vibrant, beautifully designed set of animals is created out of inter-changeable parts, allowing for children to experiment with different configurations and improve their motor skills.

Miffy Lamp (2015) by Jannes Hak, Lennart Bosker
Miffy Lamp (2015) by Jannes Hak, Lennart Bosker

Amsterdam-based design studio Mr Maria has created a series of three charming lamps to celebrate ‘Nijntje’, the white rabbit bought to life in 1955 by Dutch graphic artist Dick Bruna. The simplicity of the design and monochrome appearance are just enough to capture Nijntje’s essence, allowing its iconic shape to stand out with the lights on or off.

Little Characters by Yen Jui-Lin
Little Characters by Yen Jui-Lin

Designed by Taiwanese artist Yen Jui-Lin, these unusual yet charming wooden characters have been created using traditional woodcarving techniques. Elements of fine craftsmanship - smooth finishes, seamless joinery and impeccable inlay techniques - are visible in every piece. Some of his whimsical creations are also functional, doubling as key-holders, vases, hooks or platters.

Contorsionista by Javier Bermejo, Pico Pao
Contorsionista by Javier Bermejo, Pico Pao

A different kind of construction game coming from Spanish manufacturer Pico Pao. The workshop stands out through its outstanding craftsmanship and 'no-rules' approach to play, focusing instead on helping the user take enjoyment from the simple act of experimenting.

Duck and Duckling (1959) by Hans Bølling
Duck and Duckling (1959) by Hans Bølling

The Duck and the Duckling were designed by Danish architect and designer Hans Bølling. Both pieces were inspired by an incident that took place in the neighborhood of Fredriksborg in Copenhagen when a family of ducks attempted to cross a busy road in the middle of rush hour, prompting a policeman to stop all cars and pedestrians to cross safely. The handmade ducks are made out of teak wood with a smooth finish.

Wooden Animals (1930) by Ladislav Sutnar
Wooden Animals (1930) by Ladislav Sutnar

Designed by celebrated Czech graphic designer Ladislav Sutnar, the Elephant is part of the Wooden Animals collection, which also includes a rhino, an elephant, a camel and a lion. Sutnar was well known for his modern, abstract style but also for his drive to integrate principles of alternative teaching methods and low-cost industrial production.

Monkey (1951) by Kay Bojesen
Monkey (1951) by Kay Bojesen

One of Kay Bojesen’s most famous works, this toy remains a classic of Scandinavian design. Made from sustainable teak and limba - an African hardwood - Monkey is constructed out of 31 wooden parts and is crafted by hand in Denmark.

Alma Therapy Dollls  (2019) by Yaara Nusboim
Alma Therapy Dollls (2019) by Yaara Nusboim

Created by Israeli designer Yaara Nusboim, each of these carefully crafted dolls corresponds to a different feeling – love, fear, pain, emptiness, anger and safety. The designer explains: "Toys, not words, are the language of a child. Playing with a toy provides a safe psychological distance from the child's private problems and allows them to experience thoughts and emotions in a way that's suitable for their development."

Beaver Tumble (2018) by Plan Toys
Beaver Tumble (2018) by Plan Toys

An entertainment game that teaches strategy, problem-solving and helps children improve their hand-eye coordination skills. Plan Toys are made in Thailand from rubber trees that no longer produce latex and use non-formaldehyde glue, organic colour pigments and water-coloured dyes. The whole manufacturing process is carbon-neutral.

Plus and Minus (1970) by Bruno Munari
Plus and Minus (1970) by Bruno Munari

The visual game 'Plus and Minus' consists of 72 cards, each with a different image. A selection of these images have a transparent background and can be layered to make different, more complex superimpositions and stimulate children's creativity.

Kaleidoscope House (2001)  Laurie Simmons, Peter Wheelwright
Kaleidoscope House (2001) Laurie Simmons, Peter Wheelwright

Comissioned and produced by Bozart Toys, the Kaleidoscope House is an interactive creative play environment, designed by Laurie Simmons and New York architect Peter Wheelwright. The layout is defined by luminescent, acrylic separation walls and populated with custom, miniature furniture created by well-known designer such as Jasper Morrison and Michael Graves.

Balancing Toys - by Kutulu
Balancing Toys - by Kutulu

Pilot series based on geometry and a rocking motion. The hemispherical shape which forms the body of the bird allows movement of the toy. Just one touch and the bird starts swinging and pecking.

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Dollhouse and Furniture (2019) by Bubud
Dollhouse and Furniture (2019) by Bubud

Toy brand Bubud was founded by two mothers inspired by their children’s approach to play - architect Paula Zasnicoff and designer Andrea Gomes. The the laser-cut MDF kits include miniature architectural, furniture and design items that invite children to explore color, shapes, textures and sizes.

Villa Julia (2009) by Javier Mariscal
Villa Julia (2009) by Javier Mariscal

Born is Valencia and trained in Barcelona, Javier Mariscal’s design approach is influenced by the Mediterranean culture of both these cities. Villa Julia has been designed out of durable cardboard, encouraging children to express themselves creatively and decorate the playhouse with stickers and color.

Pupi Swinging Bird by Kutulu
Pupi Swinging Bird by Kutulu

Wooden bird based on geometry and rocking motion by Prague-based design team Kutulu.It is their wish to offer our youngest generation beautiful toys with a story and with culture.

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Noxus & Ortus (2015) by Kutulu
Noxus & Ortus (2015) by Kutulu

Kutulu is a team of designers and friends who are attempting to revive the Czech tradition of artistic toys of high-quality craftsmanship. It is their wish to offer our youngest generation beautiful toys with a story and with culture. Kutulu toys are characterized by their geometric shapes, vivid colours, and beech wood practices.

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Birds on a Tree (1964) by Creative Playthings
Birds on a Tree (1964) by Creative Playthings

Creative Playthings was established by Frank and Theresa Caplan in 1945 to provide simple, solid-wood, throughtfully designed toys. Some of their collaborators included: Vitali, Louis Kahn, Isamu Noguchi, Robert Winston and Henry Moore.

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Animal Boxes (2010) by Karl Zahn , Areaware
Animal Boxes (2010) by Karl Zahn , Areaware

The designer's description: 'This figural box represents a power animal - a totem for our individual ambitions. Its simple and gestural depiction is intentional, allowing the symbolism of the animal to be maintained. With the addition of hinges, it has the ability to guard important small objects. On the shelf, it is sculpture. On the side table, it's a totem. On the counter, it offers a hiding spot.'

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Bauhaus Jumping Jack (1926) by Margareta Reichardt
Bauhaus Jumping Jack (1926) by Margareta Reichardt

A prominent figure of the Bauhaus era, Margareta Reichardt was a textile artist, weaver and graphic designer. During her training at the prestigious German art school, she developed a series of wooden toys and peg dolls that are now commercially produced by Swiss toy manufacturer Naef.

Zoo Collection (2016) by Ionna Vautrin
Zoo Collection (2016) by Ionna Vautrin

The plush toy collection designed for Danish brand Elements Optimal (EO) includes three abstracted versions of a toucan, a panda and a whale as a direct reference to three natural elements: air, earth and water. Each character is made in Kvadrat’s first and most renowned textile - Hallingdal 65 - known for its flexibility and durability and flexibility.

Ichi Ni San (2017) Wooden Birds by Normann Copenhagen
Ichi Ni San (2017) Wooden Birds by Normann Copenhagen

Three eccentric characters created by Belgian design studio Beaverhousen for retailer Normann Copenhagen. Ichi Ni and San - in Japanese ‘one, two and three’ – are the abstracted versions of a penguin, a parrot and a robin. The pieces can either be placed side by side or stacked in a totem-like column.

Creatures (2003) by Donna Wilson
Creatures (2003) by Donna Wilson

London-based studio Donna Wilson released ‘Creatures’, a collection of child-like doodles turned soft toys. Each hand-made piece has its own name and personality, and has been inspired by the free, non-conventional, creative approach children show in their drawings.

Plane (2009) by Ole Søndergaard
Plane (2009) by Ole Søndergaard

‘Plane’ was created by Danish designer Ole Søndergaard for retailer Norman Copenhagen. The simple, paired back design is meant to speak to children of all ages and celebrate the freedom, joy and innocence of childhood. Each item is made of lacquered wood, non-toxic paint and is supplied with a suspension cable.

Cuboro (1986) by Matthias Etter
Cuboro (1986) by Matthias Etter

Crafted from ecologically harvested beach wood, the Swiss-made maze combines the fun of puzzle-making and marble runs. Children can enjoy creating endless configurations while developing their kinetic awareness and fine motor skills. The set includes 54 environmentally friendly wooden blocks and five Cuboro marbles.

Las Sillas (1965) by Pico Pao
Las Sillas (1965) by Pico Pao

The designer's description: 'These are chairs that can be piled up, stacked, left scattered on the floor or grouped into random shapes of difficult equilibrium. But whatever we do with them, this game lets us play with the most primitive rules, those of a child trying to challenge himself and to dare balance itself by stacking objects using the freest of artistic expression.'

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Cubebot (2010) by David Weeks
Cubebot (2010) by David Weeks

Inspired by the three-simensional Japanese Shinto Kumi-ki puzzles, Cubebot is designed to challenge children and adults alike. Made from wooden blocks held together by and elastic string, the robot folds back into a perfect cube.

Moon Chalk by Nikolas Bentel
Moon Chalk by Nikolas Bentel

Designed by New York-based designer Nikolas Bentel for Areaware, the Moon Chalk was designed to promote endless creativity combined with ‘a geometrically precise drawing tool’. Moon Chalk is made from 100% chalk, it easily washes off any surface, and is non-toxic.

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