Sola Grabbing Toy by Heiko Hilling for Naef
Sola Grabbing Toy by Heiko Hilling for Naef

Made of natural maple wood, the focus of this baby toy is the brightly colored, hidden orb. The round shape is perfect for grabbing and gentle to delicate baby hands. The orange maple ball is safely anchored. It stands at the focus of the small player’s attention and emits a soft, subtle rattle.

Black and White Mobile / Useless Machines (1927) by Bruno Munari
Black and White Mobile / Useless Machines (1927) by Bruno Munari

Italian artist Bruno Munari is known to be one of the first kinetic sculptors that joined the Futurist Movement in 1927. His black and white mobile is widely recognized as one of the first props in the Montessori learning approach, stimulating the focus and concentration of a newborn.

Sqwish (1981) by Tom Felmons
Sqwish (1981) by Tom Felmons

Designed by a NASA engineer, the Sqwish is inspired by tensegrity principles and doubles as a rattle and teether toy. Ideal for newborns and babies, the toy always returns to its original shape, no matter if squeezed, twisted or pulled.

Newborn Montessori Kit by Heirloom Kids USA
Newborn Montessori Kit by Heirloom Kids USA

The Montessori approach is all about tapping into the child’s natural ability to learn and provides guidance from as early as birth. This ‘starter’ kit, produced by Heirloom Kids is hand-crafted in the United States and includes six classic Montessori toys, all aimed to engage and enhance the infant’s motor skills and hand-eye coordination.

Fish and Bird Bath Toys (1969) by Patrick Rylands
Fish and Bird Bath Toys (1969) by Patrick Rylands

Designed by world-renowned Britsh designer Patrick Rylands, the minimalist duo was inspired by Eskimo bone carvings from the British Museum. The toys are sculptural and simple but with a comforting and tactile quality.

Bath Duck (1993) by Patrick Rylands
Bath Duck (1993) by Patrick Rylands

Recently released by Galt Toys, the Bath Duck is an iconic toy conceived by pioneering, British designer Patrick Rylands, whode attendtion to detail is outsanding: the slightest movement of the water does not only set the moving beak into motion, but it also acts as an escape route for any water entering the toy.

Creatures (2003) by Donna Wilson
Creatures (2003) by Donna Wilson

London-based studio Donna Wilson released ‘Creatures’, a collection of child-like doodles turned soft toys. Each hand-made piece has its own name and personality, and has been inspired by the free, non-conventional, creative approach children show in their drawings.

Pupi Swinging Bird by Kutulu
Pupi Swinging Bird by Kutulu

Wooden bird based on geometry and rocking motion by Prague-based design team Kutulu.It is their wish to offer our youngest generation beautiful toys with a story and with culture.

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MODU (2019) by Theo Fischer Ginman and Jonathan Rasmussen
MODU (2019) by Theo Fischer Ginman and Jonathan Rasmussen

Developed in Copenhagen, MODU is a modular, durable system of blocks made from soft foam, designed for children from as young as six months to six years old. This game is all about active play, refining the child’s motor skills and challenging the imagination. MODU blocks are made from a biological material and the pegs are 100% recyclable ABS plastic.

Zoo Collection (2016) by Ionna Vautrin
Zoo Collection (2016) by Ionna Vautrin

The plush toy collection designed for Danish brand Elements Optimal (EO) includes three abstracted versions of a toucan, a panda and a whale as a direct reference to three natural elements: air, earth and water. Each character is made in Kvadrat’s first and most renowned textile - Hallingdal 65 - known for its flexibility and durability and flexibility.

Miffy Lamp (2015) by Jannes Hak, Lennart Bosker
Miffy Lamp (2015) by Jannes Hak, Lennart Bosker

Amsterdam-based design studio Mr Maria has created a series of three charming lamps to celebrate ‘Nijntje’, the white rabbit bought to life in 1955 by Dutch graphic artist Dick Bruna. The simplicity of the design and monochrome appearance are just enough to capture Nijntje’s essence, allowing its iconic shape to stand out with the lights on or off.

Eames House Blocks (2006) by House Industries
Eames House Blocks (2006) by House Industries

In celebration of the Eames Century Modern project, House Industries created a set of 36 educational blocks that showcase letters, numbers, symbols and numerals. Each set of blocks is hand-printed with non-toxic child-safe ink in 29 screen passes and is made from replenishable Michigan-grown basswood.

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