Multi-View Puzzle (1964) by Fredun Shapur
Multi-View Puzzle (1964) by Fredun Shapur

First produced by Galt Toys in 1964, these geometric-styled puzzles are depict four different scenes : London, Farming, Seaside, Zoo. The innovation of these jigsaws lies in the possibility of collaborative play : players can enjoy building the jigsaw together from any side.

Rocking Beauty (1964-1966) by Gloria Caranica
Rocking Beauty (1964-1966) by Gloria Caranica

This abstracted rocking horse was originally designed by American designer Gloria Caranica for Creative Playthings. The broad bent birch plywood base offers steady support while an interlocking seat in a mirror curve of the base gives a secure seat with the low backrest. The toy was briefly reproduced by Design Within Reach as part of the 2009 furniture collection.

Plus and Minus (1970) by Bruno Munari
Plus and Minus (1970) by Bruno Munari

The visual game 'Plus and Minus' consists of 72 cards, each with a different image. A selection of these images have a transparent background and can be layered to make different, more complex superimpositions and stimulate children's creativity.

Birds on a Tree (1964) by Creative Playthings
Birds on a Tree (1964) by Creative Playthings

Creative Playthings was established by Frank and Theresa Caplan in 1945 to provide simple, solid-wood, throughtfully designed toys. Some of their collaborators included: Vitali, Louis Kahn, Isamu Noguchi, Robert Winston and Henry Moore.

Vache Rouge (1983) - Naef
Vache Rouge (1983) - Naef

Designed by photographer Gérard Pétremand for toy manufacturer Naef, this puzzle is fabricated in Switzerland from Central European maple, and is comprised of six wooden blocks.

Build the Town (1941) by Ladislav Sutnar
Build the Town (1941) by Ladislav Sutnar

Prototype designed by Czech avant-garde, graphic artist Ladislav Sutnar. His toy design was “based on modern theories about education and play, as well as utopian ideas about reforming society”.

Bath Duck (1993) by Patrick Rylands
Bath Duck (1993) by Patrick Rylands

Recently released by Galt Toys, the Bath Duck is an iconic toy conceived by pioneering, British designer Patrick Rylands, whode attendtion to detail is outsanding: the slightest movement of the water does not only set the moving beak into motion, but it also acts as an escape route for any water entering the toy.

Joupii (1970) by Partick Rylands
Joupii (1970) by Partick Rylands

Designed by acclaimed British toy designer Patrick Reynolds, the construction of this classic, open-ended toy is as straight forward as it gets: six pieces of wood held together by an elastic cord. This design was awarded the Duke of Edinburgh’s Prize for Elegant Design.

Bauhaus Optical Mixer of Colors (1924) by Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack
Bauhaus Optical Mixer of Colors (1924) by Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack

Including seven interchangeable cardboard discs, the wooden spinning top gives users an opportunity to play and compare the color theories of Goethe, Schopenhauer and Hölzel. The toy was originally designed as a didactic object at the Bauhaus and is currently produced by German manufacturer Naef.

Duck and Duckling (1959) by Hans Bølling
Duck and Duckling (1959) by Hans Bølling

The Duck and the Duckling were designed by Danish architect and designer Hans Bølling. Both pieces were inspired by an incident that took place in the neighborhood of Fredriksborg in Copenhagen when a family of ducks attempted to cross a busy road in the middle of rush hour, prompting a policeman to stop all cars and pedestrians to cross safely. The handmade ducks are made out of teak wood with a smooth finish.

Cuboro (1986) by Matthias Etter
Cuboro (1986) by Matthias Etter

Crafted from ecologically harvested beach wood, the Swiss-made maze combines the fun of puzzle-making and marble runs. Children can enjoy creating endless configurations while developing their kinetic awareness and fine motor skills. The set includes 54 environmentally friendly wooden blocks and five Cuboro marbles.

Las Sillas (1965) by Pico Pao
Las Sillas (1965) by Pico Pao

The designer's description: 'These are chairs that can be piled up, stacked, left scattered on the floor or grouped into random shapes of difficult equilibrium. But whatever we do with them, this game lets us play with the most primitive rules, those of a child trying to challenge himself and to dare balance itself by stacking objects using the freest of artistic expression.'

Go to link
Playplax (1966) by Patrick Rylands0_
Playplax (1966) by Patrick Rylands0_

An iconic construction game designed by British designer Patrick Rylands that continues to inspire today. The interlocking, translucent pieces challenge children to build using two dimensional surfaces rather than the classic blocks.

Interslot (1964) by Roger Limbrick
Interslot (1964) by Roger Limbrick

Designed as a series of coloured plywood shapes to be slotted together into three-dimensional sculptures, the kit takes a spin on of the ‘House of Cards’ game designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1952.

Child’s Wheelbarrow (1923) by Gerrit Rietveld
Child’s Wheelbarrow (1923) by Gerrit Rietveld

The barrow exemplifies the stylistic characteristics of De Stijl: elemental geometric forms, primary colors, the perpendicular relationship between the vertical and horizontal, and the celebration of the revealed, straight joint. As the father of six children himself, the architect and furniture designer created some of the iconic pieces of children's furniture of the twentieth century.

Fish and Bird Bath Toys (1969) by Patrick Rylands
Fish and Bird Bath Toys (1969) by Patrick Rylands

Designed by world-renowned Britsh designer Patrick Rylands, the minimalist duo was inspired by Eskimo bone carvings from the British Museum. The toys are sculptural and simple but with a comforting and tactile quality.

Eames House Blocks (2006) by House Industries
Eames House Blocks (2006) by House Industries

In celebration of the Eames Century Modern project, House Industries created a set of 36 educational blocks that showcase letters, numbers, symbols and numerals. Each set of blocks is hand-printed with non-toxic child-safe ink in 29 screen passes and is made from replenishable Michigan-grown basswood.

Pull Along Dachshund (1958) by BRIO
Pull Along Dachshund (1958) by BRIO

One of BRIO’s international bestsellers, this Dachshund toy is a classic. As the child pulls the yellow chord, the head, year and tail spring into action. BRIO was founded in 1884 in Osby, a small town in southern Sweden and is today owned by Ravensburger, one of Europe's leading manufacturers of puzzles.

Puppy (2005) by Eero Aarnio
Puppy (2005) by Eero Aarnio

The abstract Puppy Dog is an iconic product, designed by Finnish designer Eero Aarnio for Magis part of the ‘Me too’ collection. Made from extremely durable and strong polyethylene, the toy is suitable for outdoor use and is available in four sizes and various, brilliant colors.

Flash Cards (2008) and Floor Puzzles by Charlie Harper
Flash Cards (2008) and Floor Puzzles by Charlie Harper

The ABC set of flashcards - including two large floor puzzles - has been designed by feature artist Charlie Harper. The bold illustrations inspired by the wildlife are aimed to encourage children make letter and sound associations with images.

Wooden Animals (1930) by Ladislav Sutnar
Wooden Animals (1930) by Ladislav Sutnar

Designed by celebrated Czech graphic designer Ladislav Sutnar, the Elephant is part of the Wooden Animals collection, which also includes a rhino, an elephant, a camel and a lion. Sutnar was well known for his modern, abstract style but also for his drive to integrate principles of alternative teaching methods and low-cost industrial production.

Monkey (1951) by Kay Bojesen
Monkey (1951) by Kay Bojesen

One of Kay Bojesen’s most famous works, this toy remains a classic of Scandinavian design. Made from sustainable teak and limba - an African hardwood - Monkey is constructed out of 31 wooden parts and is crafted by hand in Denmark.

Bauhaus Bauspiel (1923) by Alma Siedhoff-Buscher
Bauhaus Bauspiel (1923) by Alma Siedhoff-Buscher

Alma Siedhoff-Busher began her training at the legendary Bauhaus Academy in 1922. One year later, the Bauhaused introduced itself for the first time to the public in an exhibition where the model house ‘Am Horn’ was presented as a prototype embodying the movement’s ideology. Alma was commissioned to design the furnishings for the children’s room and so the ‘Shipbuilding Game’ was created. This timeless classic is still produced today.

The Coloring Toy (1955) by Charles and Ray Eames
The Coloring Toy (1955) by Charles and Ray Eames

This timeless toy was reintroduced in 2017 and contains eight die-cut panels, sixteen premium crayons and butterfly clips. The panels can be colored, punched out and attached together, encouraging children to explore shapes and invent characters through imaginative play.

Naef Spiel (1957) by Kurt Naef
Naef Spiel (1957) by Kurt Naef

One of the first designs launched by Swiss toy manufacturer Naef, the sixteen building blocks were designed by the company’s founder himself. Following his studies in carpenting and architecture, Kurt Naef re-shaped the traditional construction block, carving out eight angled teeth within each piece. A unique feature of this building system is the stacking together of the blocks to create staggered structures that are wider at the top than at the base.

Eames Plywood Elephant (1945) by Charles and Ray Eames
Eames Plywood Elephant (1945) by Charles and Ray Eames

This item in our archive needs little introduction. It is widely known that Charles and Ray Eames spent several years developing and refining their technique for plywood molding to achieve their aesthetically striking, ergonomic furniture designs. The plywood elephant, initially designed for Charles’s daughter, proved to be most challenging to realize from a technical standpoint. Aiming to make it accessible to the audience it was initially intended for, Vitra has released a smaller, plastic ver

Lincoln Logs (1916) by John Lloyd Wright
Lincoln Logs (1916) by John Lloyd Wright

The Lincoln Logs are one of America’s most iconic toys and were inspired by Wright’s trip to Japan alongside his father, where he worked as chief assistant on the design of Tokyo’s Imperial Hotel. Conceived as a set of interlocking beams, this toy continues to stir the imagination more than a century after its creation.

ABC con Fantasia (1960) Bruno Munari
ABC con Fantasia (1960) Bruno Munari

Once again, Munari demonstrates his sensitivity to children’s need for simplicity when facing abstract concepts such as shapes and letters. By devising a collection of straight and curved soft-plastic strokes, the designer allows children to assemble every letter of the traditional alphabet or, why not, make up their own.

Sqwish (1981) by Tom Felmons
Sqwish (1981) by Tom Felmons

Designed by a NASA engineer, the Sqwish is inspired by tensegrity principles and doubles as a rattle and teether toy. Ideal for newborns and babies, the toy always returns to its original shape, no matter if squeezed, twisted or pulled.

Bauhaus Jumping Jack (1926) by Margareta Reichardt
Bauhaus Jumping Jack (1926) by Margareta Reichardt

A prominent figure of the Bauhaus era, Margareta Reichardt was a textile artist, weaver and graphic designer. During her training at the prestigious German art school, she developed a series of wooden toys and peg dolls that are now commercially produced by Swiss toy manufacturer Naef.

1/2